Most of you who are visiting this site know me as a running coach. What you don’t know is that I’ve been a sports coach since I was 10 years old. I began coaching baseball and over the years have coached basketball and soccer extensively, along with stints coaching baseball, bowling and even hockey. I’ve taught three year olds how to kick a soccer ball and I’ve coached 70 year olds on how to run a 100 mile race.

One of the coaches I admire is Brett Sutton, who I’ll say is the best triathlon coach in the world. His results speak for themselves, having coached champions from sprint distance all the way to Chrissie Wellington and her domination of the Ironman distance events.

Sutton’s background in coaching various sports. He came up coaching swimming primarily, but also stints coaching soccer, boxing and even animals, specifically horses and dogs.

My favorite interview with Sutton is this podcast on Sports Coach Radio (which I highly recommend subscribing to). I’ve listened to this podcast several times through and always catch a new bit here or there that sticks.

It also got me into researching Sutton’s coaching philosophy and has be diving down the rabbit hole of his thoughts on periodization, what he calls reverse periodization. Which, is probably just periodization but by another name. But…that’s another blog topic for another day.

Make sure to top on over to Sports Coach Radio and listen to the podcast here.

I admire his philosophy of tailoring his workouts for all of his athletes. If 10 of his athletes hit the track, six of those 10 could be doing completely different workouts based on their fitness, their injury status or their goals. It’s not a one-size fits all approach, which is what I preach at Miles to Go Endurance, although in practice, working this with tens of athletes is hard to keep up. Something I am working at on a day-to-day basis.

You can also learn more about Sutto’s coaching by visiting his website, TriSutto.com where he regularly posts information on training and..well…most unfiltered thoughts about triathlon as a whole.